A grammar of the isiZulu verb (present tense)

If you have read any of the blog posts on (automated) natural language generation for isiZulu, then you’ll probably agree with me that isiZulu verbs are non-trivial. True, verbs in other languages are most likely not as easy as in English, or Afrikaans for that matter (e.g., they made irregular verbs regular), but there are many little ‘bits and pieces’ ‘glued’ onto the verb root that make it semantically a ‘heavy’ element in a sentence. For instance:

  • Aba-shana ba-ya-zi-theng-is-el-an-a                izimpahla
  • Children   2.SC-Pres-8.OC-buyVR -C-A-R-FV 8.clothes
  • ‘The children are selling the clothes to each other’

The ba is the subject concord (~conjugation) to match with the noun class (which is 2) of the noun that plays the subject in the sentence (abashana), the ya denotes a continuous action (‘are doing something’ in the present), the zi is the object concord for the noun class (8) of the noun that plays the object in the sentence (izimpahla), theng is the verb root, then comes the CARP extension with is the causative (turning ‘buy’ into ‘sell’), and el the applicative and an the reciprocative, which take care of the ‘to each other’, and then finally the final vowel a.

More precisely, the general basic structure of the verb is as follows:

where NEG is the negative; SC the subject concord; T/A denotes tense/aspect; MOD the mood; OC the object concord; Verb Rad the verb radical; C the causative; A the applicative; R the reciprocal; and P the passive. For instance, if the children were not selling the clothes to each other, then instead of the SC, there would be the NEG SC in that position, making the verb abayazithengiselana.

To make sense of all this in a way that it would be amenable to computation, we—my co-author Langa Khumalo and I—specified the grammar of the complex verb for the present tense in a CFG using an incremental process of development. To the best of our (and the reviewer’s) knowledge, the outcome of the lengthy exercise is (1) the first comprehensive and precisely formulated documentation of the grammar rules for the isiZulu verb present tense, (2) all together in one place (cf. fragments sprinkled around in different papers, Wikipedia, and outdated literature (Doke in 1927 and 1935)), and (3) goes well beyond handling just one of the CARP, among others. The figure below summarises those rules, which are explained in detail in the forthcoming paper “Grammar rules for the isiZulu complex verb”, which will be published in the Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies [1] (finally in print, yay!).

It is one thing to write these rules down on paper, and another to verify whether they’re actually doing what they’re supposed to be doing. Instead of fallible and laborious manual checking, we put them in JFLAP (for the lack of a better alternative at the time; discussed in the paper) and tested the CFG both on generation and recognition. The tests went reasonably well, and it helped fixing a rule during the testing phase.

Because the CFG doesn’t take into account phonological conditioning for the vowels, it generates strings not in the language. Such phonological conditioning is considered to be a post-processing step and was beyond the scope of elucidating and specifying the rules themselves. There are other causes of overgeneration that we did not get around to doing, for various reasons: there are rules that go across the verb root, which are simple to represent in coding-style notation (see paper) but not so much in a CFG, and rules for different types of verbs, but there’s no available resource that lists which verb roots are intransitive, which as monosyllabic and so on. We have started with scoping rules and solving issues for the latter, and do have a subset of phonological conditioning rules; so, to be continued… For now, though, we have completed at least one of the milestones.

Last, but not least, in case you wonder what’s the use of all this besides the linguistics to satisfy one’s curiosity and investigate and document an underresourced language: natural language generation for intelligent user interfaces in localised software, spellcheckers, and grammar checkers, among others.

 

References

[1] Keet, C.M., Khumalo, L. Grammar rules for the isiZulu complex verb. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, (in print). Submitted version (the rules are the same as in the final version)

Advertisements

Bootstrapping a Runyankore CNL from an isiZulu one mostly works well

Earlier this week the 5th Workshop on Controlled Natural Language (CNL’16) was held in Aberdeen, Scotland, where I presented progress made on a Runyankore CNL [1], rather than my student, Joan Byamugisha, who did most of the work on it (she could not attend due to nasty immigration rules by the UK, not a funding issue).

“Runyankore?”, you might ask. It is one of the languages spoken in Uganda. As Runyankore is very under-resourced, any bootstrapping to take a ‘shortcut’ to develop language resources would be welcome. We have a CNL for isiZulu [2], but that is spoken in South Africa, which is a few thousand kilometres further south of Uganda, and it is in a different Guthrie zone of the—in linguistics still called—Bantu languages, so it was a bit of a gamble to see whether those results could be repurposed for Runynakore. They could, needing only minor changes.

What stayed the same were the variables, or: components to make up a grammatically correct sentence when generating a sentence within the context of OWL axioms (ALC, to be more precise). They are: the noun class of the name of the concept (each noun is assigned a noun class—there are 20 in Runyankore), the category of the concept (e.g., noun, adjective), whether the concept is atomic (named OWL class) or an OWL class expression, the quantifier used in the axiom, and the position of the concept in the axiom. The only two real differences were that for universal quantification the word for the quantifier is the same when in the singular (cf. isiZulu, where it changes for both singular or plural), and for disjointness there is only one word, ti ‘is not’ (cf. isiZulu’s negative subject concord + pronomial). Two very minor differences are that for existential quantification ‘at least one’, the ‘at least’ is in a different place in the sentence but the ‘one’ behaves exactly the same, and ‘all’ for universal quantification comes after the head noun rather than before (but is also still dependent on the noun class).

It goes without saying that the vocabulary is different, but that is a minor aspect compared to figuring out the surface realisation for an axiom. Where the bootstrapping thus came in handy was that that arduous step of investigating from scratch the natural language grammar involved in verbalising OWL axioms could be skipped and instead the ones for isiZulu could be reused. Yay. This makes it look very promising to port to other languages in the Bantu language family. (yes, I know, “one swallow does not a summer make” [some Dutch proverb], but one surely is justified to turn up one’s hope a notch regarding generalizability and transferability of results.)

Joan also conducted a user survey to ascertain which surface realisation was preferred among Runyankore speakers, implemented the algorithms, and devised a new one for the ‘hasX’ naming scheme of OWL object properties (like hasSymptom and hasChild). All these details, as well as the details of the Runyankore CNL and the bootstrapping, are described in the paper [1].

 

I cannot resist a final comment on all this. There are people who like to pull it down and trivialise natural language interfaces for African languages, on the grounds of “who cares about text in those kind of countries; we have to accommodate the illiteracy with pictures and icons and speech and such”. People are not as illiterate as is claimed here and there (including by still mentally colonised people from African countries)—if they were, then the likes of Google and Facebook and Microsoft would not invest in localising their interfaces in African languages. The term “illiterate” is used by those people to include also those who do not read/write in English (typically an/the official language of government), even though they can read and write in their local language. People who can read and write—whichever natural language it may be—are not illiterate, neither here in Africa nor anywhere else. English is not the yardstick of (il)literacy, and anyone who thinks it is should think again and reflect a bit on cultural imperialism for starters.

 

References

[1] Byamugisha, J., Keet, C.M., DeRenzi, B. Bootstrapping a Runyankore CNL from an isiZulu CNL. 5th Workshop on Controlled Natural Language (CNL’16), Springer LNAI vol. 9767, 25-36. 25-27 July 2016, Aberdeen, UK. Springer’s version

[2] Keet, C.M., Khumalo, L. Toward a knowledge-to-text controlled natural language of isiZulu. Language Resources and Evaluation, 2016. DOI: 10.1007/s10579-016-9340-0 (in print) accepted version

First steps for isiZulu natural language generation

Yes, Google Translate English-isiZulu does exist, but it has many errors (some very funny) and there’s a lot more to Natural Language Generation (NLG) than machine translation, such as natural language-based query interfaces that has some AI behind it, and they are needed, too [1]. Why should one bother with isiZulu? Muendane has his lucid opinions about that [2], and in addition to that, it is the first language of about 23% of the population of South Africa (amounting to some 10 million people), about half can speak it, and it is a Bantu language, which is spoken by nearly 300 million people—what works for isiZulu grammar may well be transferrable to its related languages. Moreover, it being in a different language family than the more well-resourced languages, it can uncover some new problems to solve for NLG, and facilitate access to online information without the hurdle of having to learn English or French first, as is the case now in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The three principal approaches for NLG are canned text, templates, and grammars. While I knew from previous efforts [3] that the template-based approach is very well doable but has its limitations, and knowing some basic isiZulu, I guessed it might not work with the template-based approach but appealing if it would (for a range of reasons), that no single template could be identified so far was the other end of the spectrum. Put differently: we had to make a start with something resembling the foundations of a grammar engine.

Langa Khumalo, with the Linguistics program and director of the University Language Planning and Development Office at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and I have been trying to come up with isiZulu NLG. We have patterns and algorithms for (‘simple’) universal and existential quantification, subsumption, negation (class disjointness), and conjunction; or: roughly OWL 2 EL and a restricted version of ALC. OWL 2 EL fist neatly with SNOMED CT, and therewith has the potential for interactive healthcare applications with the isiZulu healthcare terminologies that are being developed at UKZN.

The first results on isiZulu NLG are described in [4,5], which was not an act of salami-slicing, but we had more results than that fitted in a single paper. The first paper [4] will appear in the proceedings ofthe 4th workshop on Controlled Natural language (CNL’14), and is about finding those patterns and, for the options available, an attempt at figuring out which one would be best. The second paper [5], which will appear in the 8th International Web Rule Symposium (RuleML’14) conference proceedings, is more about devising the algorithms to make it work and how to actually generate those sentences. Langa and I plan to attend both events, so you can ask us about the details either in Prague (18-20 Aug) or Galway (20-22 Aug) in person. In the meantime, the CRCs of the papers are online (here and here).

Regarding the technical aspects, the main reasons why we cannot get away with devising templates to generate isiZulu controlled natural language is that isiZulu is non-trivial:

  • There is a whole system of noun classes: nouns are grouped in one of the 17 noun classes, each with their own peculiarities, which is illustrated in Figure 1, below;
  • Agglutination, informally: putting lots of bits and pieces together to make a word. A selection of those so-called ‘concords’ is included in Figure 2, below;
  • Phonological conditioned copulatives, meaning that the ‘is a’ depends on the term that comes after it (ng or y); and
  • Complex verb conjugation.
isiZulu noun classes with an example (source: [5]).

isiZulu noun classes with an example (source: [5]).

A selection of isiZulu concords (source: [5])

A selection of isiZulu concords (source: [5])

What does this mean for the verbalization? In English, we use ‘Each…’ or ‘For all…’ for the universal quantifier and it doesn’t matter over which noun it is quantified. In isiZulu, it does. Each noun class has its own ‘each’ and ‘for all’, and it is not acceptable (understandable) to use one for the wrong noun class. For disjointness, like “Cup is not a Glass” ({\sf Cup \sqsubseteq \neg Glass} in DL), in English we have the ‘is not a’ regardless what comes before or after the subsumption+negation, but in isiZulu, the copulative is omitted, the first noun (OWL class, if you will) brings in a so-called negative subject concord, the second noun brings in a pronominal, and they are glued together (e.g., Indebe akuyona Ingilazi, where the second word is composed of aku + yona), and to top it off, each noun class has its own concord and pronomial. A seemingly simple conjunction—just an ‘and’ in English—has to be divided into an and-when-it-is-used-in-an-enumeration and an and-when-it-is-a-connective, and when it is used in an enumeration, it depends on the first letter of the noun that comes after the ‘and’. Existential quantification is even more of a hassle. The table below shows a very brief summary comparing typical patterns in English with those for isiZulu.

A few DL symbols, their typical verbalization options in English, and an indication of possible patterns (source: [4])

A few DL symbols, their typical verbalization options in English, and an indication of possible patterns (source: [4])

We did ask isiZulu speakers which of the possible options they preferred (in a survey, with Limesurvey localized to isiZulu), but there wasn’t an overwhelming consistent agreement among them except for one of the options for existential quantification (the –dwa option), although there was more agreement among the linguists than among the non-linguists, possibly due to dialect influences (results can be found in [4]).

If you don’t feel like reading the two papers, but still would like to have some general overview and examples, you also can check out the slides of the CS colloquium I gave last week. I managed to ‘lure in’ also ICT4D people—and then smack them with a bit of logic and algorithms—but the other option, being talking about the other paper accepted at RuleML, probably would have had to be a ‘cookie colloquium’ to get anyone to attend (more about that paper in another post—it is fascinating, but possibly of less interest to a broader audience). If you want to skip the tedious bits and just get a feel of how one of the algorithms works out: check out the example starting on slide 63, which shows the steps to go from {\sf \forall x (uSolwazi(x) \rightarrow \exists y (ufundisa(x, y) \land Isifundo(y)))} in FOL, or {\sf uSolwazi \sqsubseteq \exists ufundisa.Isifundo} in DL (“Each professor teaches at least one course”, if the vocabulary were in English), to “Bonke oSolwazi bafundisa isifundo esisodwa”.

Clearly, a lot remains to be done.

References

[1] Alberts, R., Fogwill, T., Keet, C.M. Several Required OWL Features for Indigenous Knowledge Management Systems. 7th Workshop on OWL: Experiences and Directions (OWLED’12). 27-28 May, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. CEUR-WS Vol-849. 12p

[2] Muendane, N.M. I am an African. 2006, Soultalk CC.

[3] Jarrar, M., Keet, C.M., Dongilli, P. Multilingual verbalization of ORM conceptual models and axiomatized ontologies. STARLab Technical Report, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium. February 2006.

[4] Keet, C.M., Khumalo, L. Toward verbalizing logical theories in isiZulu. 4th Workshop on Controlled Natural Language (CNL’14), 20-22 August 2014, Galway, Ireland. Springer LNAI. (in press)

[5] Keet, C.M., Khumalo, L. Basics for a grammar engine to verbalize logical theories in isiZulu. 8th International Web Rule Symposium (RuleML’14), August 18-20, 2014, Prague, Czech Republic. Springer LNCS (in press).