A set of competency questions and SPARQL-OWL queries, with analysis

As a good beginning of the new year, our Data in Brief article Dataset of Ontology Competency Questions to SPARQL-OWL Queries Translations [1] was accepted and came online this week, which accompanies our Journal of Web Semantics article Analysis of Ontology Competency Questions and their Formalisations in SPARQL-OWL [2] that was published in December 2019—with ‘our’ referring to my collaborators in Poznan, Dawid Wisniewski, Jedrzej Potoniec, and Agnieszka Lawrynowicz, and myself. The former article provides extensive detail of a dataset we created that was subsequently used for analysis that provided new insights that is described in the latter article.

The dataset

In short, we tried to find existing good TBox-level competency questions (CQs) for available ontologies and manually formulate (i.e., formalise the CQ in) SPARQL-OWL queries for each of the CQs over said ontologies. We ended up with 234 CQs for 5 ontologies, with 131 accompanying SPARQL-OWL queries. This constitutes the first gold standard pipeline for verifying an ontology’s requirements and it presents the systematic analyses of what is translatable from the CQs and what not, and when not, why not. This may assist in further research and tool development on CQs, automating CQ verification, assessing the main query language constructs and therewith language optimisation, among others. The dataset itself is indeed independently reusable for other experiments, and has been reused already [3].

The key insights

The first analysis we conducted on it, reported in [2], revealed several insights. First, a larger set of CQs (cf. earlier work) indeed did increase the number of CQ patterns. There are recurring patterns in the shape of the CQs, when analysed linguistically; a popular one is What EC1 PC1 EC2? obtained from CQs like “What data are collected for the trail making test?” (a Dem@care CQ). Observe that, yes, indeed, we did decouple the language layer from the formalisation layer rather than mixing the two; hence, the ECs (resp. PCs) are not necessarily classes (resp. object properties) in an ontology. The SPARQL-OWL queries were also analysed at to what is really used of that query language, and used most often (see table 7 of the paper).

Second, these characteristics are not the same across CQ sets by different authors of different ontologies in different subject domains, although some patterns do recur and are thus somehow ‘popular’ regardless. Third, the relation CQ (pattern or not) : SPARQL-OWL query (or its signature) is m:n, not 1:1. That is, a CQ may have multiple SPARQL-OWL queries or signatures, and a SPARQL-OWL query or signature may be put into a natural language question (CQ) in different ways. The latter sucks for any aim of automated verification, but unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be an easy way around that: 1) there are different ways to say the same thing, and 2) the same knowledge can be represented in different ways and therewith leading to a different shape of the query. Some possible ways to mitigate either is being looked into, like specifying a CQ controlled natural language [3] and modelling styles [4] so that one might be able to generate an algorithm to find and link or swap or choose one of them [5,6], but all that is still in the preliminary stages.

Meanwhile, there is that freely available dataset and the in-depth rigorous analysis, so that, hopefully, a solution may be found sooner rather than later.

 

References

[1] Potoniec, J., Wisniewski, D., Lawrynowicz, A., Keet, C.M. Dataset of Ontology Competency Questions to SPARQL-OWL Queries Translations. Data in Brief, 2020, in press.

[2] Wisniewski, D., Potoniec, J., Lawrynowicz, A., Keet, C.M. Analysis of Ontology Competency Questions and their Formalisations in SPARQL-OWL. Journal of Web Semantics, 2019, 59:100534.

[3] Keet, C.M., Mahlaza, Z., Antia, M.-J. CLaRO: a Controlled Language for Authoring Competency Questions. 13th Metadata and Semantics Research Conference (MTSR’19). 28-31 Oct 2019, Rome, Italy. Springer CCIS vol 1057, 3-15.

[4] Fillottrani, P.R., Keet, C.M. Dimensions Affecting Representation Styles in Ontologies. 1st Iberoamerican conference on Knowledge Graphs and Semantic Web (KGSWC’19). Springer CCIS vol 1029, 186-200. 24-28 June 2019, Villa Clara, Cuba. Paper at Springer

[5] Fillottrani, P.R., Keet, C.M. Patterns for Heterogeneous TBox Mappings to Bridge Different Modelling Decisions. 14th Extended Semantic Web Conference (ESWC’17). Springer LNCS vol 10249, 371-386. Portoroz, Slovenia, May 28 – June 2, 2017.

[6] Khan, Z.C., Keet, C.M. Automatically changing modules in modular ontology development and management. Annual Conference of the South African Institute of Computer Scientists and Information Technologists (SAICSIT’17). ACM Proceedings, 19:1-19:10. Thaba Nchu, South Africa. September 26-28, 2017.

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