An architecture for Knowledge-driven Information and Data access: KnowID

Advanced so-called ‘intelligent’ information systems may use an ontology or runtime-suitable conceptual data modelling techniques in the back end combined with efficient data management. Such a set-up aims to provide a way to better support informed decision-making and data integration, among others. A major challenge to create such systems, is to figure out which components to design and put together to realise a ‘knowledge to data’ pipeline, since each component and process has trade-offs; see e.g., the very recent overview of sub-topics and challenges [1]. A (very) high level categorization of the four principal approaches is shown in the following figure: put the knowledge and data together in the logical theory the AI way (left) or the database way (right), or bridge it by means of mappings or by means of transformations (centre two):

Figure 1. Outline of the four approaches to relate knowledge and data in a system. (Source: adapted from [6])

Among those variants, one can dig into considerations like which logic to design or choose in the AI-based “knowledge with (little) data” (e.g.: which OWL species? common logic? Other?), which type of database (relational, object-relational, or rather an RDF store), which query language to use or design, which reasoning services to support, how expressive it all has to and optimized for what purpose. None is best in all deployment scenarios. The AI-only one with, say, OWL 2 DL, is not scalable; the database-only one either lacks interesting reasoning services or supports few types of constraints.

Among the two in the middle, the “knowledge mapping data” is best known under the term ‘ontology-based data access’ (OBDA) and the Ontop system in particular [2] with its recent extension into ‘virtual knowledge graphs’ and the various use cases [3]. Its distinguishing characteristic of the architecture is the mapping layer to bridge the knowledge to the data. In the “Data transformation knowledge” approach, the idea is to link the knowledge to the data through a series of transformations. No such system is available yet. Considering the requirements for that, it turned out that a good few components are already available and just needed one crucial piece of transformations to convincingly put that together.

We did just that and devised a new knowledge-to-data architecture. We dub this the KnowID architecture (pronounced as ‘know it’), abbreviated from Knowledge-driven Information and Data access. KnowID adds novel transformation rules between suitably formalised EER diagrams as application ontology and Borgida, Toman & Weddel’s Abstract Relational Model with SQLP ([4,5]) to complete the pipeline (together with some recently proposed other components). Overall, it then looks like this:

Figure 2. Overview of the KnowID architecture (Source: adapted from [6])

Its details are described in the article entitled “KnowID: an architecture for efficient Knowledge-driven Information and Data access” [6], which was recently publish in the Data Intelligence journal. In a nutshell: the logic-based EER diagram (with deductions materialised) is transformed into an abstract relational model (ARM) that is transformed into a traditional relational model and then onward to a database schema, where the original ‘background knowledge’ of the ARM is used for data completion (i.e., materializing the deductions w.r.t. the data), and then the query posed in SQLP (SQL + path queries) is answered over that ‘extended’ database.

Besides the description of the architecture and the new transformation rules, the open access journal article also describes several examples and it features a more detailed comparison of the four approaches shown in figure 1 above. For KnowID, compared to other ontology-based data access approaches, its key distinctive architectural features are that runtime use can avail of full SQL augmented with path queries, the closed world assumption commonly used in information systems, and it avoids a computationally costly mapping layer.

We are working on the implementation of the architecture. The transformation rules and corresponding algorithms were implemented last year [7] and two computer science honours students are currently finalising their 4th-year project, therewith contributing to the materialization and query formulation steps aspects of the architecture. The latest results are available from the KnowID webpage. If you were to worry that will suffer from link rot: the version associated with the Data Intelligence paper has been archived as supplementary material of the paper at [8]. The plan is, however, to steadily continue with putting the pieces together to make a functional software system.

References

[1] Schneider, T., Šimkus, M. Ontologies and Data Management: A Brief Survey. Künstl Intell 34, 329–353 (2020).

[2] Calvanese, D., Cogrel, B., Komla-Ebri, S., Kontchakov, R., Lanti, D., Rezk, M., Rodriguez-Muro, M., Xiao, G.: Ontop: Answering SPARQL queries over relational databases. Semantic Web Journal, 2017, 8(3), 471-487.

[3] G. Xiao, L. Ding, B. Cogrel, & D. Calvanese. Virtual knowledge graphs: An overview of systems and use cases. Data Intelligence, 2019, 1, 201-223.

[4] A. Borgida, D. Toman & G.E. Weddell. On referring expressions in information systems derived from conceptual modeling. In: Proceedings of ER’16, 2016, pp. 183–197

[5] W. Ma, C.M. Keet, W. Oldford, D. Toman & G. Weddell. The utility of the abstract relational model and attribute paths in SQL. In: C. Faron Zucker, C. Ghidini, A. Napoli & Y. Toussaint (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management (EKAW’18)), 2018, pp. 195–211.

[6] P.R. Fillottrani & C.M. Keet. KnowID: An architecture for efficient knowledge-driven information and data access. Data Intelligence, 2020 2(4), 487–512.

[7] Fillottrani, P.R., Jamieson, S., Keet, C.M. Connecting knowledge to data through transformations in KnowID: system description. Künstliche Intelligenz, 2020, 34, 373-379.

[8] Pablo Rubén Fillottrani, C. Maria Keet. KnowID. V1. Science Data Bank. http://www.dx.doi.org/10.11922/sciencedb.j00104.00015. (2020-09-30)

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