Book chapter on conceptual data modelling for biological data

My invited book chapter, entitled “Ontology-driven formal conceptual data modeling for biological data analysis” [1], recently got accepted for publication in the Biological Knowledge Discovery Handbook: Preprocessing, Mining and Postprocessing of Biological Data, edited by Mourad Elloumi and Albert Y. Zomaya, and is scheduled for printing by Wiley early 2012.

All this started off with my BSc(Hons) in IT & Computing thesis back in 2003 and my first paper about the trials and tribulations of conceptual data modelling for bio-databases [2] (which is definitely not well-written, but has some valid points and has been cited a bit). In the meantime, much progress has been made on the topic, and I’ve learned, researched, and published a few things about it, too. So, what is the chapter about?

The main aspect is the ‘conceptual data modelling’ with EER, ORM, and UML Class Diagrams, i.e., concerning implementation-independent representations of the data to be managed for a specific application (hence, not ontologies for application-independence).

The adjective ‘formal’ is to point out that the conceptual modeling is not just about drawing boxes, roundtangles, and lines with some adornments, but there is a formal, logic-based, foundation. This is achieved with the formally defined CMcom conceptual data modeling language, which has the greatest common denominator between ORM, EER, and UML Class Diagrams. CMcom has, on the one hand, a mapping the Description Logic language DLRifd and, on the other hand, mappings to the icons in the diagrammatic languages. The nice aspect of this it that, at least in theory and to some extent in practice as well, one can subject it to automated reasoning to check consistency of the classes, of the whole conceptual data model, and derive implicit constraints (an example) or use it in ontology-based data access (an example and some slides on ‘COMODA’ [COnceptual MOdel-based Data Access], tailored to ORM and the horizontal gene transfer database as example).

Then there is the ‘ontology-driven’ component: Ontology and ontologies can aid in conceptual data modeling by providing solution to recurring modeling problems, an ontology can be used to generate several conceptual data models, and one can integrate (a section of) an ontology into a conceptual data model that is subsequently converted into data in database tables.

Last, but not least, it focuses on ‘biological data analysis’. A non-(biologist or bioinformatician) might be inclined to say that should not matter, but it does. Biological information is not as trivial as the typical database design toy examples like “Student is enrolled in Course”, but one has to dig deeper and figure out how to represent, e.g., catalysis, pathway information, the ecological niche. Moreover, it requires an answer to ‘which language features are ‘essential’ for the conceptual data modeling language?’ and if it isn’t included yet, how do we get it in? Some of such important features are n-aries (n>2) and the temporal dimension. The paper includes a proposal for more precisely representing catalysis, informed by ontology (mainly thanks to making the distinction between the role and its bearer), and shows how certain temporal information can be captured, which is illustrated by enhancing the model for SARS viral infection, among other examples.

The paper is not online yet, but I did put together some slides for the presentation at MAIS’11 reported on earlier, which might serve as a sneak preview of the 25-page book chapter, or you can contact me for the CRC.

References

[1] Keet, C.M. Ontology-driven formal conceptual data modeling for biological data analysis. In: Biological Knowledge Discovery Handbook: Preprocessing, Mining and Postprocessing of Biological Data. Mourad Elloumi and Albert Y. Zomaya (Eds.). Wiley (in print).

[2] Keet, C.M. Biological data and conceptual modelling methods. Journal of Conceptual Modeling, Issue 29, October 2003. http://www.inconcept.com/jcm.

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2 responses to “Book chapter on conceptual data modelling for biological data

  1. Pingback: E-bike

  2. Pingback: Book chapter on conceptual data modeling for biology published | Keet blog

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